Amazing slow downer review

December 18, 2021 / Rating: 4.9 / Views: 963

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Amazing slow downer review

It slows down a recording from a cd or mp3 but retains the key so that you can hear more easily what's going on in the recording and begin to duplicate it. Great fun and a wonderful learning tool. I use it on my Kindle HD Fire which actually has a pretty good sound system for a rather small device.

Customer reviews Amazing Slow Downer
Change the speed of the music - from 20% (one fifth speed) to 200% (double speed) without changing the pitch. Change the pitch in semi-tones - at full or changed speed. Adjust the pitch in cents (100ths of a semi-tone) to suit your instrument. Real-time processing - all described above is done in real-time - just insert the CD and press the play button! Also slows down MP3, Wave, Windows Media Audio, Ogg, FLAC and AAC/M4A files on your computer in real-time. Change the speed of the music - from 20% (one fifth speed) to 200% (double speed) without changing the pitch. Change the pitch in semi-tones - at full or changed speed. Adjust the pitch in cents (100ths of a semi-tone) to suit your instrument. Real-time processing - all described above is done in real-time - just insert the CD and press the play button! Also slows down MP3, Wave, Windows Media Audio, Ogg, FLAC and AAC/M4A files on your computer in real-time. I'm nearing the end of a 30-day free trial of Transcibe! I like it but before buying it, I thought I would see what the other options are and also what others think about them. In addition to changing speed, you can change pitch, save multiple loops, and more. Amazing Slow Downer is the older product and some use it. Today I heard that VLC, a free media player, will allow one to slow down videos or audio files without changing pitch. It even has a karaoke option (which is more or less effective) that gets rid (partially) of the vocals track. (And speed them up too, if desired.) I don't know if it's as flexible as the other two but since I have VLC installed on an old laptop, I'll tinker with it later. I will be using the software on a PC running Windows, not a mobile device. It is easy with VLC to slow down or speed up a playback, and it's fine. I don't care too much for that last tool, but it's there, and there was a time or two when it was useful. (I don't know whether that makes a difference.) Just interested in hearing if one of these is hands-down better than the others or whether it's "six of one, half dozen of the other." Also, if there's another piece of software worth considering (around the same price), I'd be interested in that too. I bought my license about 10 years ago (I get regular updates), and it's paid for itself may times over. Graham, I have VLC and use it but never thought of trying to slow things down with it. (As the old song says, "It never entered my mind.") How do you do it? I'm not looking to make loops (yet) or anything, I just don't know how to make a track play slower in VLC. Say I have a track from a Herb Ellis book / CD and the track's a little fast for me. How does one tell the interface that is what one wants???? Not on my PC at the moment, so from memory I think it's a sort of 'chevron' button, in between the Play (triangle) and Stop (square) buttons? This is pretty technical stuff and most people won't be interested, but it can be useful for certain things. Start play then click the backward chevron and it slows down by a certain amount. Also look in the Playback menu, and maybe Advanced options. I've been using Transcribe for years and have tried most of the other slowdown & loop options, both commercial and freeware. It loads videos quickly (occasionally useful is to have the video flip and turn 180 degrees so it's an approximate view of you looking down at the guitar). Pitch change by cents, semitones & octaves; transpose by instrument. Really powerful automation which I haven't touched that, to quote: We have a simple method whereby commands for Transcribe! For instance suppose you want to load a sound file, change its speed, and export it. Now suppose you have a folder with 200 files in and you want to do all of them. With automation, it is possible to put the necessary commands in a text file and then leave it working while you have a cup of tea. Also, automation makes it possible to control Transcribe! I've been using Amazing Slow Downer on my i Phone for a long time. from another application or script or command line : the controlling app can put commands into a Transcribe! It is really simple to use, saves loops, changes pitch, etc. It's just a few dollars, and since its on my phone it's extremely portable. There is a free version, so you can check out whether or not it suits you. Not on my PC at the moment, so from memory I think it's a sort of 'chevron' button, in between the Play (triangle) and Stop (square) buttons? Start play then click the backward chevron and it slows down by a certain amount. Also look in the Playback menu, and maybe Advanced options. Just had a look - what I said above is not quite right. The 'chevron' button is to the left of the horizontal line which shows playback progress (where the slider thing moves along while it plays). Also on mine you can just click on the little box which shows speed (1 x ) and a dropdown appears where you can change the playback speed. I've been using Amazing Slow Downer on my i Phone for a long time. It is really simple to use, saves loops, changes pitch, etc. It's just a few dollars, and since its on my phone it's extremely portable. There is a free version, so you can check out whether or not it suits you. I've been using Amazing Slow Downer on my i Phone for a long time. It is really simple to use, saves loops, changes pitch, etc. It's just a few dollars, and since its on my phone it's extremely portable. There is a free version, so you can check out whether or not it suits you. the free version used to play the first two minutes of the song and that is it which is fine with me. nothing interesting happens after the first 2 minutes anyway... I used transcribe for 10 years, but moved to Song Surgeon. To my ears, when you change to another key, Song Surgeon sounds more accurate. Maybe the latest version of Transcribe has improved it's Key change function. transcribe does video so that makes it much better than amazing slowdowner IMO. I haven't used the slowdown feature in VLC and until this thread didn't even know it existed. I really like transcribe but the user interface is extremely non-intuitive. are two very different guys VLC has been designed to be a tool to play music of video, with the possibility to modify playback speed. For sure one can use it to slow down a piece of music. Transcribe has been designed as a tool to help transcribing, so it does a lot more, spectrum analysis, piano roll, set markers, up to 20x slowdown, availability of a programming language to automate tasks, audio/video splitting, adding text notes along the piece of music or video, etc .. With it I managed to fully transcribe a piece of music containing : 2 singers, piano, flute, bass, choirs, violins. Transcribe has been designed as a tool to help transcribing, so it does a lot more, spectrum analysis, piano roll, set markers, up to 20x slowdown, availability of a programming language to automate tasks, audio/video splitting, adding text notes along the piece of music or video, etc .. With it I managed to fully transcribe a piece of music containing : 2 singers, piano, flute, bass, choirs, violins. No problem Matter of taste and even more of habits. Personnally I found the Transcribe UI more visual and more appropriate to the kind of work I'm usually doing. My recommendation would be for anyone interested to try using both and decide after enough experiments, specially since it takes time to perceive all what Transcribe can do. I've tried a lot of these programs, but I always come back to Transcribe. The GUI makes it easy to be very precise in creating accurate loops, the support is great and it's pretty open to different formats. Recently, a friend asked me to look at Song Surgeon. I didn't spend much time with it, but it did have one feature that seemed unique. You could "arrange" your loops into a song and save it as a single file. Not really my cup of tea, but a neat idea that some might find that useful. gems, there is a nice "navigation" feature across all the set markers. is the following, not necessarily in the exact same order of operations. 1) set measure markers from beginning to end (of what I'm interested in, or the whole piece), which means hitting "M" on the keyboard while the music is played back, 2) set beat markers by editing the first measure marker to use 4 subdivisions (of the piece is in 4/4 time of course), all the following measures will be also using 4 subdivisions. 3) possibly edit a few measure markers to change them into section markers (intro, head, solo 1, solo 2, ... Sometimes I also change the displayed measure numbers according to some needs (for instance having each section numbered 1 to N measures). One can change this division factor along the music piece (for instance if the music piece contains 7/8 and 4/4 section, as in Blue Rondo à la Turk). This is done by setting measure number as ) for instance default 33 changed into 1) 4) then I focus on what I want to transcribe, possibly fine tuning some measure marker positions. I do not necessarily transcribe in the forward order of sections and measures. 5) Sometimes I use the video to analyse guitar fingerings, I generally use the text annotation feature to keep track of my observations (for instance xx4556) One of my uses of transcribe is to export several version of a playback track, each at a different speed, which I then load and play on my phone or whatever in increasing speed order. That's a good way to practice tricky pieces of music. I've used Transcribe for years (both on Mac and PC), and I like it a lot! I had previously used Amazing Slowdowner but switched because Slowdowner was missing important features that Transcribe has (had). To be fair, my Slowdowner experience was quite a while ago, and features may have been added. OTOH, the only big drawback to Transcribe that I am aware of is the lack of a mobile version. If by that you mean using it on a smartphone or a tablet. This and possible solutions are discussed in the Transcribe! FAQ located at FAQ - Miscellaneous Questions about Transcribe! I use it on my 7 year old 15" 6 pound laptop , and I performed a number of transcriptions away from home, upper half display for a Transcribe windows, lower half for Sibelius, and a headset, or small bluetooth monitors. The only complaint I have is that navigating along the music piece requires different mouse or keyboard commands between Transcribe & Sibelius as set by default (I never tried to assign the same keyboard shortcuts to each for similar operations, but this can be done). I'll soon replace this laptop with the light 13" Dell XPS13 which has the size of a 11" ultrabook. This will make my music computing environment mobile enough for my taste.

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